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Skift Business Traveler: Gogo Shows Off Flashy High Speed Internet On Private SXSW Flights


Skift Take

Gogo’s challenge to roll out new products while supporting old products creates a challenge for the company not just from an operational standpoint but in terms of user expectations.

— Grant Martin

What to Know Now

Out at the South By Southwest Interactive festival in Austin, Texas, last week, Gogo shared its shiny new 737 test plane equipped with next-gen 2Ku connectivity with the airline community.

Satellite connections, as we all know, are coming to the entire industry soon — and Gogo is helping to lead that charge. So why the dog and pony show?

In part, it’s grandstanding. But it’s also about staying dominant in an ever-competitive market. Sure, Gogo operates the lion’s share of internet for domestic aircraft, but with new connectivity solutions coming on line, the rest of the world is now at stake. In addition, Gogo also needs to keep its legacy customers happy, something that American sorely pointed out in February.

It’s easy to see then that there’s a lot riding on putting on a good show and illustrating high quality internet. And truly as advertised, the 2Ku that the Skift Business Traveler editorial team tried is greased-lightning fast. Now we just need to work on updating those legacy ATG connections.

Social Quote of the Day

It’s actually working really well. Using Gogo’s new 2Ku system.

– @danielbru | Daniel Brusilovsky, Digital Initiatives Lead @Warriors 



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Your Turn

This year’s Skift Forum is shaping up to be a doozy. Check out the confirmed list of travel executives showing up to the event here.

Tips and Comments

Can be sent to gm[at]skift[dot]com or to @grantkmartin

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