Every luxury hospitality company should have conservation on its agenda in 2020 — with an emphasis on the “should.” We have no doubt that plenty of luxury properties will prioritize opulence over their environmental impact in the months ahead, but that’s a mistake.

In our latest feature, Skift contributor Samantha Shankman shows that what’s good for luxury hospitality and what’s good for the environment aren’t mutually exclusive. Not only do luxury travelers expect to see gorgeous, pristine surroundings — and are willing to pay more for it — but they now more than ever want to book a property with an ecological conscience.

My favorite example from where I grew up? Terranea Resort, in Palos Verdes, California, meticulously restored the peninsula’s native species of plants and worked with the Palos Verdes Land Conservancy to ensure they got it right.

Gen Z is especially interested in sustainable travel and will soon have the spending power to make an impact in the luxury market. The catch is that travel companies had better take these efforts seriously and not just use conservation as a marketing ploy, because that could have the reverse effect on booking. We’ll keep tabs on other luxury and wellness leaders in the conservation space in the year ahead, being mindful of which companies are making environmental changes for the better.

For feedback or news tips, reach out via email at lb@skift.com or tweet me @lesliebarrie.

Leslie Barrie, Luxury & Wellness Editor

Six Looks at Luxury & Wellness

Luxury-Led Land ConservationCan Luxury Hospitality Play a Key Role in Land Conservation? Outside of Africa, where poaching, forestry, and resource exploitation can also threaten wildlife habitats, luxury hospitality leaders are playing a role in protecting land and creating opportunities around conservation.

The 2020 Innovators in Travel and Hospitality: Winter Edition: Twice a year, this column looks at who is doing it right. Here are some of the most inspiring innovations in design, service, and guest experience in hospitality and travel. Let the debates begin.

Ace Hotel Boutique Chain Consolidates Ownership After Years of Turmoil: Ace Hotel has finalized the consolidation of its ownership after years of disputes with the estate of late co-founder Alex Calderwood. Now that that’s been settled, what will the boutique hotel chain concentrate on next?

Medical Tourism Emerges as a Bright Spot for Flagging Dubai: Dubai has faced a slump in recent years as it struggled amid a global economic slowdown, an oversupplied real estate sector, and slow tourism activity due to regional unrest. But its ability to build a reputation for itself as a medical tourism hub in the Middle East has provided some much-needed support for its travel sector.

‘Skip-Gen’ Vacations Are a New Family Travel Offshoot for Travel Advisors: Skip-gen” travel involving grandparents and grandchildren is an important market for travel advisors to pay attention to. Not only are grandparents more active these days, many see travel as a rare bonding opportunity with grandchildren. 

What This Minor Vs. Marriott Lawsuit Reveals About the Hotel Biz: Minor is a step closer to getting its case against Marriott heard in a Thai court, probably a nightmarish scenario for hotel management companies if only because it bares open fault lines.

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Leslie Barrie [lb@skift.com] curates the Skift Luxury & Wellness Travel Report. Skift emails the newsletter every Thursday.

Photo Credit: The Resort at Paws Up takes part in a number of conservation efforts, including habitat improvement along Elk Creek. Luxury hospitality leaders are taking a role in leading land conservation efforts. The Resort at Paws Up