Collecting data from events is key to helping an organization grow. It helps planners understand which attendees went to which sessions, whether they liked the speakers, and whether, perhaps, they will return in the future.

But not all data research is created equal. By drilling down beneath the surface — beneath the basic who, what, where of attendee information — planners can start to get a richer picture of attendee behavior and intent.

Fortunately there is now technology that helps planners do just that. Badges and wristbands that provide heat-mapping services and can track dwell time allow organizers to get a much fuller picture of how attendees really feel about an event. The problem is, not many planners are using it.

According to Michael Burns, head of sales and marketing at event tech platform Aventri, planners are well aware of the technology, but adoption is slow. So slow, there are still no industry standards or best practices surrounding the data collected from these tracking devices.

Burns walks us through the use cases for this technology and talks about some of the challenges he sees for the industry.

Check out this story, and many more, below.

If you have any feedback about the newsletter or news tips, feel free to reach out via email at ic@skift.com or tweet @ikcarey.

Isaac Carey, Travel Reporter

The Future of Events and Meetings

The Events Industry Has a Blindspot When It Comes to Attendee Engagement: If you can’t first measure engagement, then it’s hard to improve it. Digital tracking devices are a good investment for planners, and something to add to their toolbox, along with mobile apps and surveys.

Marriott, IHG, Accor and Hilton Invest in Meetings Booking Platform: The hotel industry has had a tough time improving the painful process of selling event space and room blocks to meeting planners. Perhaps this deal is a sign the sector is finally ready to invest in meaningful change to help repair the ecosystem.

Finding the Right Venue Still Plagues Meeting Planners Despite Digital Tools: Most planners still have a hard time sourcing and booking the right venue for an event. High costs and rude salespeople are only a couple of the obstacles they face despite new technology aimed to help ease the process.

Marriott to Introduce Dynamic Pricing for Bonvoy Award Bookings: Marriott’s new dynamic pricing will make award nights more expensive for those who can only travel during peak season. Those with some flexibility in their schedules, however, may be in for a treat.

Around the Industry

High-Touch and High-Tech Find Common Ground With Travel Advisors: Virtuoso CEO: Virtuoso Travel Week drew record attendance to the annual event it likens to Fashion Week. While heavily touting the consortium’s new Wanderlist travel planning tool, it also emphasized the human touch.

Nobu Now Sees Lodging as Its ‘Speedboat’: With 18 hotels signed, opened, or under construction, Nobu Hotels is growing its hotel portfolio rapidly. But the chain is focused only on major global markets.

Barcelona Openings Underline a Luxury Market in Transition: Sophisticated serenity is the best way to describe luxury hospitality in the Catalan capital where troubles including sky-high petty crime rates, legality surrounding Airbnb, and political tensions bubble under the surface. For a city once considered the coolest in Europe, its development is useful to watch for other cities just now entering their gilded age of tourism.

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Travel Reporter Isaac Carey [ic@skift.com] curates the Skift Meetings Innovation Report. Skift emails the newsletter every Wednesday.

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Photo Credit: Cvent CONNECT Europe 2018. Most planners have not invested in the right technology to track and analyze attendee behavior. Cvent / Flickr