Throughout the week we post dozens of original stories, connecting the dots across the travel industry, and every weekend we sum it all up. This weekend roundup examines tourism.

For all of our weekend roundups, go here.

>>Coming together and trying to carve out a deal from the UK government makes sense for the tourism industry. The only problem with that is the country’s looming separation from the European Union, which is casting a shadow over its political and economic future: UK Tourism Industry Unites to Target Post-Brexit Growth

>>Every business traveler hates delays and annoying layovers. There are pronounced regional differences in the value business travelers perceive during and after a trip, though: Global Business Travelers Agree the Biggest Hassle Is Time Spent in Transit

>>China has initiated the formation of a new world tourism organization. The UNWTO, WTTC and PATA are exceedingly polite about it, but there are undercurrents of uneasiness about how much influence the new China-led World Tourism Alliance can wield: China Challenges WTTC With Launch of Global Tourism Group

>>As developed markets reach their saturation point in international travel expenditure, emerging markets are heading towards the pole position: New Skift Research Report: Key Emerging Outbound Travel Markets 2017

>>As guests seek personalization, authenticity, and experiences outside their daily grinds, these well-designed outdoor lodges hit a sweet spot by maintaining a low profile that appeals to their customers’ underlying desire to disconnect: The New Luxury Vacation Is Crunchier and Quieter

>>As the Chinese luxury market evolves, it is getting far more complicated. It’s no longer enough to slap a luxury label on a product to get the Chinese consumer to bite. Bain takes a look at what the market’s maturation means for luxury purveyors worldwide: The Changing Habits of the Chinese Luxury Consumer

>>Today we’re excited to announce that our second annual Skift Forum Europe will take place in Berlin! Save with Early Bird tickets for a limited time: Skift Forum Europe Is Coming to Berlin in April 2018

>>The cruise industry in the Caribbean quickly pivoted as it headed into its busiest season. While cruise lines might be able to scrape by relatively unharmed — it’s easy to change ports when something goes wrong — the negative impact on destinations missing out on cruise sailings will be felt for years: Hurricane-Spared Caribbean Islands Are Preparing to Welcome More Cruise Ships

>>New data suggest that black travelers make decisions based on safety and acceptance, but should black travelers have to pay more than their white counterparts for those benefits? Black Millennial Travelers Plan Trips Around Safety and Acceptance

>>The recent hurricanes are expected to have mostly short-term impacts on business travel and economic forecasts, but they exposed serious weaknesses in companies’ preparations for disruption caused by extreme weather: Why Corporate Travel Needs to Prepare for Wilder Weather

>>Erratic weather and emerging technologies alike are creating a more complex corporate travel ecosystem: Disruption From All Directions — Skift Corporate Travel Innovation Report

>>Like a book or movie you’ve decided to take in for a second time, we’ve discovered there is a lot of value in viewing these videos even if you attended the Skift Global Forum in person. In many of them, there is an abundance of insight to absorb: Skift Global Forum 2017 On-Stage Videos Are Now Live

>>Many Caribbean destinations are on the road to recovery from recent storms, but they are also at the mercy of government relief efforts, which have fallen way short in some places. In Puerto Rico’s case, the island is dealing with the federal government, which treated hurricanes on the U.S. mainland much more seriously: Trump Slams Puerto Rico But Island’s Tourism Leader Expresses Confidence in Relief Efforts

Photo Credit: A beach in the east coast town of Humacao, Puerto Rico, August 8, 2015. Puerto Rico struggles to recover from recent hurricanes. Ricardo Arduengo / Associated Press