This week’s round-up of travel ads focuses on scenery with destinations using drones to give visitors an overview of their attractions, hotels capturing the quiet personal moments of guests’ stay, and brands letting images do the talking.

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NYC & Company’s neighborhoods campaign is one of the best things that the tourism board has done in recent years. It’s latest installment is on Harlem with the accompanying video Inside Harlmen: A Local’s Guide. The short film features suggestions of six Harlem locals and scenes from neighborhood attractions like the famous Apollo Theater and the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture.

Kuoni Travel launches its largest campaign around the theme ‘Find Your Amazing.’ The campaign, directed by Grey London, marks a change for the operator, which aims to positions itself as a premium vacation brand. The ad is filmed off the coast of the Maldives where synchronized swimmer Lenka Tanner appears to run on water.

Drone videos hit the travel industry in 2014 and have since become a popular way to give potential visitors a quick overview of a destination, from aspiration point of view. Visit London employs the technique in its latest video with scenes of top museums and attractions across the city.

Visit Philly also gets into the drone game in its recent I am Philadelphia video that shows sweeping scenes of the city as well as close-ups on locals and public squares. The video was released as Visit Philly announced record high engagement on its digital platforms. C​ombined visitation ​to visitphilly.com and uwishunu.com hit a record 14.5 million​ and the tourism board connect​ed​ with 750,000 followers​ across its social media channels. ​

Hyatt Gold Passport recently published a series of ads that captures the quiet moments of a trip. By highlighting the personal benefits of vacation, Hyatt quietly pushes its loyalty program that allows guests to earn points at locations worldwide.

Photo Credit: The front of the Rodin Museum is seen through to iron gates. Visit Philly / YouTube