Rooms Hotels

Hotel Guests Ditch Room Service for Food Delivery Apps

Jul 23, 2014 7:00 am

Skift Take

Many hotel guests today are more accustomed to ordering food online or via an app than placing a call. This, plus the added diversity, leaves few questions about why takeout is beating room service in many hotels.

— Samantha Shankman

Free Report: The Changing Business of Extended-Stay Hotels

Chris Council  / C2 Photography

This undated image provided by The Little Nell hotel in Aspen, Colo., shows the Three Little Piggies breakfast sandwich, served at the hotel's Element 47 restaurant. Chris Council / C2 Photography


Hotel guests increasingly prefer to order their eats from takeout restaurants rather than from room service, according to data from Chicago-based online food-ordering service GrubHub Inc.

While revenues from room service declined 9.5 percent from 2007 to 2012, according to PFK Hospitality Research, GrubHub found that takeout orders to hotels increased 125 percent in the past three years after analyzing orders delivered to 8,000 hotels across the country.

GrubHub has a network of 29,000 restaurants in 700 cities, the company said in a release, and found that on average, hotel diners spend about 11 percent more per order than other diners. Hotel guests in mid-sized cities also tend to order in more often. The 10 leading hotel takeout order destinations were:

  1. Minneapolis
  2. Kansas City, Mo.
  3. Orlando, Fla.
  4. Virginia Beach, Va.
  5. Raleigh, N.C.
  6. Cleveland
  7. Portland, Ore.
  8. Jacksonville, Fla.
  9. San Jose, Calif.
  10. Miami

“Whether travelers are looking for more diverse, more affordable, or more accessible food options, it’s clear that takeout is becoming the natural alternative to traditional room service,” GrubHub President Jonathan Zabusky said in a statement.

(c)2014 the Chicago Tribune. Distributed by MCT Information Services.

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