Destinations Asia

India’s Aman Resorts Changes Hands So Owner Can Reduce Debt

Feb 10, 2014 5:00 am

Skift Take

Playing the five-star game in Asia may be fun to start, but when debt piles up you make moves to pull back from ambitious expansion.

— Jason Clampet

Report: The Rise of the Silent Traveler

 / Aman Resorts

Aman Resort in Vinh Hy Bay. / Aman Resorts


DLF Ltd., India’s largest real estate company, has sold Aman Resorts to Peak Hotels & Resorts Group Ltd. and Aman founder Adrian Zecha at a higher valuation than announced earlier.

The sale at an enterprise value of $358 million does not include the Lodhi Hotel in Delhi, according to a company statement today. It didn’t provide an equity value for the sale. The company said in December 2012 that it would sell Aman Resorts to Zecha for an enterprise value of $300 million, which includes net debt.

The deal would help DLF bring down its debt and refocus on real estate after it expanded into hotels, windfarms and running export processing zones. The company’s debt has fallen from 250.7 billion rupees ($4 billion) in March 2012 to 177 billion rupees in September after it sold some of its businesses, including windfarms and insurance, according to data compiled by Bloomberg.

DLF bought Aman Resorts in November 2007 for $400 million, including $150 million of debt, from Zecha. Aman has luxury properties around the world, including in the U.S. and Indonesia. It runs hotels such as Amanwana, made famous after the late Princess Diana visited the secluded property in Indonesia’s Sumbawa province.

Editors: Andreea Papuc, Tomoko Yamazaki. To contact the reporter on this story: George Smith Alexander in Mumbai at galexander11@bloomberg.net. To contact the editor responsible for this story: Philip Lagerkranser at lagerkranser@bloomberg.net. 

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