Skift Travel News Blog

Short stories and posts about the daily news happenings around the travel industry.

Airlines

IDEAS: Emilia Wickstead to Design Air New Zealand’s Next Uniform

4 months ago

Air New Zealand will be collaborating with Kiwi fashion designer Emilia Wickstead on the design of its next uniform.

Emilia Wickstead has been selected to design the next Air New Zealand uniform.
Credit: Air New Zealand

Emilia was selected following a pitch process involving a number of native designers – all tasked with creating a uniform based on select criteria, including sustainability, functionality, safety, and te ao Māori – or a respect of Māori customs and protocols.

“I could not be prouder, or more excited, to have been selected as Air New Zealand’s next uniform designer. This is a true passion project for me; one that further connects me with my homeland Aotearoa, and the community and places that I love,” Emilia was quoted in a press release.

Take a look at the post below from Air New Zealand regarding the launch, and why this project is so important to Emilia:

The carrier and Emilia will now work on a process to refine the designs, with onboard trials and consultations set to take place before unveiling the final design in late 2024.


Skift Ideas uncovers the most creative and forward-thinking innovations happening across travel. We celebrate innovation through our Skift IDEA Awards and hear from leaders on our Ideas podcast.

You can listen and subscribe to the Skift Ideas Podcast through your favorite podcast app here.

Airlines

IDEAS: Korean Air Upcycles Crew Uniforms to Create First Aid Kits 

6 months ago

Korean Air has donated 500 first aid pouches made from recycled crew uniforms to local causes.

The airline usually discards of crew uniforms when they reach the end of their life cycle, but under this new initiative, old pilot and cabin crew uniforms have been given a second lease of life having been upcycled into first aid pouches.

Credit: Korean Air

The Seoul Gangseo Senior Welfare Center and Incheon Yongyu Elementary School were the recipients of the kits, which included essential medications that were funded by donations of around KRW 5 million from the airline’s employees.

Korean Air has a history of embracing upcycling opportunities, having previously created name tags and golf ball markers from the materials of a retired Boeing 777, and reimagining retired cabin life vests into cosmetic pouches.

Korean Air is not the only airline exploring methods of repurposing old crew uniforms, with Finnair launching a new initiative earlier this month to upcycle old uniforms into composite furniture.


Skift Ideas uncovers the most creative and forward-thinking innovations happening across travel. We celebrate innovation through our Skift IDEA Awards and hear from leaders on our Ideas podcast.

You can listen and subscribe to the Skift Ideas Podcast through your favorite podcast app here.

Airlines

IDEAS: Finnair Transforming Worn-Out Uniforms Into Composite Products

6 months ago

Finnair is repurposing worn-out crew uniforms into composite products, thanks to a new partnership with Finnish workwear manufacturer Image Wear.

Credit: Finnair

Any uniform that remains in good condition is refurbished and reused where appropriate, with Finnair noting that its ‘employees have welcomed the used uniform parts that have been cleaned and maintained, as they are more sustainable than new ones.’

“We have established a process to ensure a constant supply of used clothing pieces that have been carefully cleaned and inspected. Primarily, we allocate these items to fulfill our employees’ uniform orders. We supplement the orders with new uniform parts when necessary,” says Merja Lindberg, who is responsible for Finnair uniforms.

For uniforms that have reached the end of their wearable life, Finnair is working with Image Wear to repurpose the material so it can be used for manufacturing recycled composite products. The material, which is made by combining recycled plastic particles with textiles, can be used to create various outdoor items including tables and benches. 

“Composite products are durable – their estimated lifespan is around 50 years, and at the end of their lifecycle, they can still be recycled into new products. In this way, worn-out work clothes do not end up as waste, but continue their life in a new form,” says Kati Tukiainen, Image Wear’s Responsibility manager.


Skift Ideas uncovers the most creative and forward-thinking innovations happening across travel. We celebrate innovation through our Skift IDEA Awards and hear from leaders on our Ideas podcast.

You can listen and subscribe to the Skift Ideas Podcast through your favorite podcast app here.