Throughout the week we post dozens of original stories, connecting the dots across the travel industry, and every weekend we sum it all up. This weekend roundup examines tourism trends.

For all of our weekend roundups, go here.

The Big Fat Indian Election Is the Country’s New Tourism Draw: Politics and tourism are strange bedfellows, but the big fat Indian general election next month is giving that notion a vote of no confidence. The festival of democracy can spark a new niche: election tourism.

Skift Forum Europe: Peak DMC’s Zina Bencheikh on Creating a Pipeline for Women in Travel. Zina Bencheikh has witnessed firsthand what it takes to bring greater diversity to the travel industry — and what the business rewards can be.

The Southwest Effect Is Already Impacting Hawaii Tourism: Southwest Airlines’ entry into the Hawaii market is likely to bring more competitive airfares from the U.S. mainland and also on inter-island routes. The good news may be tempered, however, by rising hotel rates and limited availability in Hawaii’s most popular destinations.

Disney Gets Tough on Strollers and Smokers to Prep for Star Wars Crowds: Disney is clearly awaiting a flood of visitors in the coming months, and high prices alone won’t keep crowds in check. Now in-park smoking areas and extra-large strollers have to go.

Skift Forum Europe: London & Partners CEO on Promoting Tourism in the Age of Brexit: London is one of the world’s most popular tourist destinations, so attracting visitors isn’t really a problem. What the city needs to ensure is that locals benefit from something that can be divisive if managed incorrectly.

Royal Brunei Airlines Takes On Tourism Promotion for a Whole Country: The national carrier has set a target of doubling visitor arrivals to Brunei by 2021. But news of the country getting closer to the full implementation of Sharia law will no doubt be unsettling for most tourists.

Combating Overtourism Requires a More Holistic Approach: For decades, destination managers were able to ignore the negative effects of tourism. Now, the age of overtourism calls for a more robust approach to plan for the future.

Carnival’s Europe Business Is Running Into Brexit Uncertainty: Carnival Corp.’s global reach can be a double-edged sword: The company isn’t dependent on just one market to fill its ships, but it’s also exposed to instability in wide swaths of the world.

Photo Credit: A crowded market in Mumbai, India. Adam Cohn / Flickr