Throughout the week we post dozens of original stories, connecting the dots across the travel industry, and every weekend we sum it all up. This weekend roundup examines tourism trends.

For all of our weekend roundups, go here.

>>For more than a century, Puerto Rico has been divided along two identities – Puerto Rican and American. But Hurricane Maria has forced it to reach a point where its tourism industry must merge the two, and market the destination in a way like many others on the mainland have done for decades if it hopes to become a global success story: Puerto Rico Emerges From Hurricane Maria With a Plan and New Hope for Tourism

>>At least Mexico’s president-elect, López Obrador, has tapped someone intimately familiar with the travel industry and how it operates locally and internationally. It’s more than the United States can say it’s done for travel in the past year and a half: What Mexico’s President-Elect Could Mean for Tourism Amid Protectionism Worries

>>Despite the travel industry having had years to get used to the idea of new rules governing the sale of vacations in the European Union, there are still plenty of people scratching their heads over the changes: New Packaged Vacations Law in Europe Causing Confusion

>>The luxury goods market is going to be worth more than $450 billion by 2025 and many of its trends are relevant to travel as well. Younger consumers see brands in a different way than previous generations — and for them consistency is key: Millennials and Chinese Consumers Are Rewriting the Luxury Rulebook

>>Even if you think you’ve heard enough about millennials and Chinese consumers, it’s worth keeping an eye on how both are reshaping the luxury travel industry — especially as brands are looking to target them in the coming years: How Millennials and Chinese Consumers Will Change Luxury Travel

>>For all its imperfections, Valencia still has its spirit and a sense of authenticity that other destinations have lost in some ways in the age of overtourism. As the city fights to maintain equilibrium, it has a unique opportunity to set an example via the proper management of tourism. Don’t put doors in the field. Set up bike lanes instead: What a Month of Bicycle Rides Through Valencia Reveals about Authenticity in Tourism

>>It’s one thing to make your event as accessible as possible, but the rest of the travel industry needs to do more to adequately present suitable options for every traveler. In a welcome development, online booking is finally placing a new focus on accessibility: Accessibility That Goes Beyond the Event

>>While some cruise lines have had success targeting younger travelers, it is older people who are still the most interested. But so what? There are plenty of wealthy retirees who are happy to while away their days sipping cocktails at sea: UK and Ireland Cruisers Are Actually Getting Older Despite Push for Millennials

>>Cruise lines are confident that people will fill the ships they order, and shipbuilding yards are packed with business for years to come. Will Wall Street shake off its worries that demand won’t keep up? Wall Street Concerns Aren’t Keeping Cruise Lines From Ordering More Ships

>>Periods of prolonged hot weather can hurt tour operators with potential customers staying at home or booking a domestic trip instead. However, it shouldn’t be used as an excuse to mask other problems within a business: Mixed Fortunes for European Tour Operators as Summer Season Begins

>>Skift Global Forum is the most unique travel event of the year. Read on for the top reasons to attend. I hope to see you there! Top Reasons You Need to Be at Skift Global Forum

Photo Credit: Old San Juan on May 2, 2018. Puerto Rico continues emerging from the devastation of Hurricane Maria. greyloch / Flickr