New York City-area airports are notorious for substandard food options, dark corridors and long wait times, and airlines are now trying to change the perception of these important hubs by introducing new restaurants and sophisticated technology.

JetBlue recently spent $743 million to build a new international terminal at John F. Kennedy Airport as did Delta in an effort to woo high-spending business travelers.

Now United Airlines is investing $120 million to renovate and improve its hub at Newark International. United flies more passengers on international flights than any other U.S. airline and Newark is an important gateway for foreign and domestic flyers.

United selected OTG Management, which also led JetBlue’s and Delta’s terminal renovations, to head the project.

Following a similar formula used in the other terminals, more than 55 new dining venues are expected at the new terminal, with at least 20 created by celebrated chefs.

Although temporary restaurant pop-up shops will be introduced in November, the full renovation is expected to take 18 months.

The terminal will also feature 6,000 iPads on which travelers can track their flights, order food or purchase travel amenities. More than 10,000 outlets and USB interfaces will be added to the redesigned terminal seating.

The iPads are becoming OTG’s signature mark, and with reason.

The restaurant and retail company reported a double-digit increase in sales at LaGuardia Terminals C and D following the introduction of iPads and new food concepts. Departing passengers spend more money, approximately $11 per person, before and after a flight at these terminals than at any other of the top 50 U.S. airports.

OTG has renovated spaces in 11 North American airports. Its relationship is either with the airport or airline depending on which party owns the space; however, all of its projects in New York have been directly with the carrier.

Photo Credit: The Garden City Diner is one of the current dining venues that could get cut during renovations at United's hub inside Newark Terminal C. Mitch Altman / Flickr