Throughout the week we post dozens of original stories, connecting the dots across the travel industry, and every weekend we sum it all up. This weekend roundup examines tourism trends.

For all of our weekend roundups, go here.

>>Midterm elections have rarely been this galvanizing or controversial. For industry observers and executives, the question remains of how changes in Washington will impact the business of travel. With a divided government, expect most of the changes to regulations to come from the Trump administration: What Looms for the Travel Industry in D.C. After the Midterms

>>The U.S. House of Representatives and Senate, controlled by opposing parties, will be at loggerheads over many issues related to both the travel industry and travelers. However, there will be plenty of wiggle room, if not on airplanes with reduced passenger legroom, then in the halls of Congress, where some legislation will undoubtedly get done: Committee Leadership Changes in Divided Congress Will Be Mixed Bag for Travel Industry

>>Our first Asia Editor, Raini Hamdi, shares how she intends to cover the vast, fast, diverse, and dynamic region of Asia. Apart from remembering to breathe deeply, she’ll be focusing on the stories that count: How I Plan to Cover the World’s Most Exciting Travel Region as Skift’s New Asia Editor

>>The closer relationship between the American Society of Travel Advisors and its subsidiary, the renamed ASTA Small Business Network, promises greater visibility for independents with consumers. However, the real winner may be the parent organization, given the growing importance of the independent sector: Independents Day: ASTA and Subsidiary Forge Closer Relationship

>>As a travel advisor focusing on the entertainment industry, Amy Keeling has been practicing personalization for years, although not in the way the tech world thinks about it. Keeling has become an expert in ensuring comfort for her roster of rock bands as she learned their unique preferences over the last 25 years: Tzell Travel Advisor Turned Eric Clapton and Pink Floyd Into Fans of Her Tour Planning

>>The survivors of skirmishes past, from commission cuts to the perceived threats of the internet, have reinvented their businesses and thrive in a new landscape where personal touch still matters: Travel Advisor Innovation Report Issue One: When a Job Feels Like Rock and Roll

>>Disney had to lower ticket prices to boost attendance at its two-year-old Shanghai park, but that’s not the story at most properties around the world. The company saw its overall theme park revenue jump 9 percent in its fiscal fourth quarter: Disney CEO Still Bullish on China Despite Shanghai Park Slump

>>Homelessness is a reality that has been exacerbated by various economic and public health crises. San Francisco is one destination that thinks it can find a solution: San Francisco Wants to Solve Tourists’ Top Complaint by Hiring the Homeless

>>Travelers love nothing more than a good deal, and that’s exactly what much of Turkey is offering right now. A cooling economy has travelers striking while the iron is hot: Turkey’s Weak Economy Entices Travelers With Good Deals

>>Norwegian Cruise Line Holdings keeps trying new ways to get higher-spending passengers on board. Quarterly results show the efforts are working so far: Norwegian Cruise Is Trying to Luxe Up Its Mass-Market Line

>>While some cruise lines are pulling back on their presence in China, Carnival Corp. is moving forward with its long-planned joint venture with local partners. Will domestic travelers flock to a homegrown brand? Carnival Will Launch Its Next Phase of China Growth in 2019

>>Virgin Voyages is intent on setting itself apart, and its food choices do stand out: no buffet, no main dining room, no restaurants with an extra charge. Execution will be key: Virgin Voyages Says Farewell to Cruise Cliche: The All-You-Can-Eat Buffet

>>SeaWorld is making theme park visitors an offer some apparently can’t refuse: a good deal. With attendance continuing to rise and a slate of new attractions on the horizon, the operator might finally be leaving the bad times behind: SeaWorld’s Price-Cutting Strategy Is Fueling a Comeback

>>A brand like Hims (and now Hers), which makes it easier to gain access to health and wellness at a lower cost, all while touting smart design, knows what it’s doing. And it will probably see the revenue to prove it: Wellness Newsletter: Direct-to-Consumer Healthcare Gets a Millennial Makeover

>>The question is not whether hoteliers and operators should invest in Ethiopia, but what is best for Ethiopia in balancing these new demands while protecting its people and its profound history and cultures: Ethiopia’s Nascent Luxury Tourism Market Starts to Take Hold

>>Ethiopia is slowly making its name in luxury tourism. The question is how fast will the rate of change be? The Challenge for Ethiopia’s Luxury Push

>>Planners have to get creative as both expectations and costs are set to increase in 2019. Technology can only do so much and event design will shift to reflect the financial priorities of organizations holding events: Cost Cutting Could Lead to Big Changes for Meetings in 2019

>>Planners expect 2019 to be another tough year, with more commission cuts and increased expenses on the horizon. Succeeding will require doing more with less and getting creative about crafting killer events with a smaller bankroll: Costs Rise With Expectations for the Event Sector

>>While China is an attractive market, it’s traditionally been a tough place for corporate travel. Joint ventures between global travel management companies and Chinese travel providers are combining local market expertise with travel management standards to reduce friction for corporations: Corporate Travel in China Means Managing Complexity

Photo Credit: Washington, D.C. near Capitol Hill. The U.S. midterm elections gave Democrats control of the House of Representatives. Wayne Thume / Flickr