Throughout the week we post dozens of original stories, connecting the dots across the travel industry, and every weekend we sum it all up. This weekend roundup examines tourism trends.

For all of our weekend roundups, go here.

>>We came up with “overtourism,” a simple portmanteau to appeal to people’s baser instincts with an element of alarm and fear in it. That is the biggest reason why the term and its exploration by everyone has caught on: The Genesis of Overtourism: Why We Came Up With the Term and What’s Happened Since

>>In Montgomery, Alabama, the tourism board and a new memorial to victims of lynching are building off each other’s visibility, drawing visitors into a revitalized area of the Deep South they may not recognize: Lynching Memorial Draws Tourists to a New Kind of Deep South

>>The new rewards program at Six Flags is designed to keep its already-loyal members engaged and satisfied enough to stay enrolled in a monthly membership. Will the theme park loyalty idea catch on with other operators? Six Flags Is Taking Theme Park Loyalty to the Next Level

>>It is time to reclaim the word tourist, and recalibrate it to mean something good. Tourists can see the world with fresh eyes, unencumbered with the daily accumulations of local life. A new hotel in North Adams, Massachusetts, seeks to do just that: No Need to Live Like a Local: All Tourists Welcome

>>It looks like 2018 could be the year that business travel growth truly peaks. With the specter of trade wars, Brexit, and financial instability on the horizon, the sector’s financial outlook may change in a hurry: Torrid Growth Projected for Business Travel Despite Tariffs and Trade Wars

>>We’re looking forward to a lively, casual night of networking on September 26 to kick off Skift Global Forum. Want to join in on the fun? Register today! Just Announced: Skift Global Forum Opening Event Venue

Photo Credit: Iguazu Falls in Argentina on December 5, 2016. Overtourism is an increasing concern in many parts of the world. Linda De Volder / Flickr