Throughout the week we post dozens of original stories, connecting the dots across the travel industry, and every weekend we sum it all up. This weekend roundup examines hospitality.

For all of our weekend roundups, go here.

>>Solomons is correct in pointing out the diverging strategies of the big hotel companies and over the next couple of years we will be able to find out which one was right: IHG Happy to Keep Doing Things Differently to Competitors

>>Could it be that van Paasschen is on his way to making a full return to hospitality? Former Starwood CEO Frits van Paasschen Is Now Advising citizenM

>>Claus Sendlinger’s thoughts on curation and programming are something the hotel industry should be paying more attention to: Video: Design Hotels CEO on the Next Big Innovation in Hospitality

>>This is our most comprehensive and actionable report outlining the current state and potential future of hotel marketing and distribution: New Research Report: 2017 Outlook on Hotel Direct Booking

>>New luxury consumers need to come from somewhere, and a slightly more wealthy middle class can provide an entry point for brands: How Luxury Hotels Can Adapt to a Rising and Wealthier Middle Class

>>Luxury hoteliers often face similar challenges as other high-end brands and should seize the opportunity to start a conversation about luxury training and employment that crosses several sectors: The Psychology Behind Luxury Employee Training Programs

>>We’ll definitely be keeping our eye on what develops as far as Marriott’s decisions for its reservations and loyalty platforms going forward. But we’re still not so convinced they’re keeping all 30 of those brands over the long term: Marriott CEO: Technology Is the Biggest Risk in the Starwood Merger

>>There’s plenty of opportunity out there for third parties or the big players like HomeAway and Airbnb to capitalize on offering more ancillary guest services for professionally managed vacation rentals: Vacation Rental Managers Don’t Have the Tools to Scale Hospitality

>>Yes, top leadership changes often take place after an acquisition. But the number of “no comments” we’ve received, and the quickness of it all, makes us think there’s something much more complicated happening here: Generator Hostels CEO Departs and Officials are Mum on a New One

>>If anyone can reinvent a hotel brand, or the hospitality industry as a whole, time and time again, we’re placing our money on Ian Schrager: Ian Schrager’s Public Hotel Brand Isn’t Dead After All

Photo Credit: Former Generator Hostel CEO Fredrik Korallus (right) was interviewed at the Skift Global Forum in New York City in September 2016. Korallus resigned from the company following its acquisition by Queensgate Investments. Skift