United Airlines will install Gogo’s high-speed Air-to-Ground (ATG-4) in-flight connectivity service on 200 of its United Express E170, E175 and CRJ700 aircraft, with installations to be completed by next summer.

United will be the first U.S. airline to offer this higher-speed ATG-4 connectivity on regional jets.

This new connectivity will be complimented by Gogo’s in-flight entertainment solution, allowing passengers to watch movies and television shows on-demand on their portable electronic devices.

The service will be available to passengers using United’s mobile app on their Wi-Fi-enabled iOS and Android devices, and through the browser on their laptop computers.

“United is pleased to extend our growing Wi-Fi and personal device entertainment platform to our fleet of larger regional jets,” said Jeff Foland, United’s executive vice president of marketing, technology and strategy. “These new elements will enhance the entire in-flight experience for our customers.”

Delta Airlines recently set a high-bar for connectivity and entertainment services on its Delta and Delta Connection flights longer than one and a half hours launching its Delta Studio product (a program which will also be completed in 2015). United has upped the connectivity game by being the first to install the faster ATG-4 Gogo connection on regional jets.

United also plans to begin a trial of Gogo’s 2Ku satellite Wi-Fi on five of the carrier’s aircraft that operate its p.s. “Premium Service” on flights between New York JFK and Los Angeles, and on its New York JFK and San Francisco routes. United currently offers Gogo’s ATG-4 product on these aircraft.

“United has been a great partner of ours and we are excited to extend our in-flight internet service to a large part of their regional fleet,” said Gogo’s president and CEO, Michael Small. “We are also excited to bring their passengers personal device entertainment, as we have long believed that you need multiple technologies to service the needs of all aircraft types and each route that those aircraft fly.”

Photo Credit: A United regional jet. United Airlines