Transport Airlines

Ryanair Continues Its Reinvention With a Smartphone App That Works

Jul 25, 2014 10:38 am

Skift Take

We wonder where they’re keeping the people who’ve been running Ryanair all these years.

— Marisa Garcia

Free Report: The State of Student Travel

Skift

Ryanair's new app on iOS. Skift


Ryanair has unveiled its first truly user-friendly app, after what have been two dismal previous attempts—the first one demanded passengers pay €3 for the privilege.

Skift pointed out the utter uselessness of Ryanair’s second-generation iOS app this October, but the airline has (finally) turned its IT and UX game around. Even its new website is attractive and modern, with intuitive navigation.

“We’ve worked hard to develop a product which we’re proud of and which will make traveling with Ryanair even better,” said Ryanair’s Chief Marketing Officer, Kenny Jacobs, promising regular app updates with added features.

The Ryanair app is available for iPhone and Android devices. Customers can log in with their ‘My Ryanair’ profile (or as Guest) to:

• Search Ryanair’s 1,600 fare routes
• Make quicker flight bookings
• Choose & book allocated seats
• Manage bookings & add baggage
• Book hotels & car rentals
• Book optional services such as insurance
• Check-in & download mobile boarding passes
• View live flight information

This time the app is free, which you’d expect, but with Ryanair it’s always best to double-check.

With a UX that beats the apps of some of the big players, Ryanair is now tied with easyJet’s own very handy app.

The competition between these two Low-Cost carriers is just as hot as their mutual competition against the European legacy carriers, with easyJet enjoying double digit profit growth. Both LCCs are upping their game in a bid to attract frugal business travelers away from the majors.

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