Quantcast
Destinations

The local economic impact of the Super Bowl, as visualized by Square

Feb 06, 2013 5:00 am

Skift Take

The impact of a big event on a destination is always difficult to determine when there are so many gatekeepers between the data and the public. Square’s openness helps people get at least a tiny, honest glimpse of what kind of money communities really make.

— Jason Clampet

Free Report: The State of Chinese Outbound Market Travel

Free Report: The State of Student Travel


American football’s Super Bowl, like all major athletic events, is traditionally a huge boon for the city that hosts it. Analysts estimated that this year’s game, held this past Sunday in New Orleans, Louisiana, would bring $185 million to the city, which is still recovering from the impact of Hurricane Katrina in 2005.

The jury is out on exactly how much money the event brought to the city as a whole. But Square, the mobile payment system that allows vendors to accept credit cards through their smartphones and tablets, has given Quartz some stats and a couple of maps showing how the game boosted sales carried out with their software:

  • Sales involving Square increased from roughly $500,000 in the weekend before the Super Bowl (including Friday, Saturday, and Sunday) to about $800,000 the weekend of.
  • More than 1,000 vendors use Square in New Orleans. Many, such as food trucks, merchants at outdoor markets, and taxicab drivers, used to be cash-only operations, according to the company.
  • Party planners, DJs, music groups, and others in the entertainment industry collected more than eight times as much revenue during Super Bowl weekend than they did the weekend prior.

square-before

square-after

 

This story originally appeared on Quartz, a Skift content partner.

Additional links from Quartz:

Tags: , ,

Next Up

More on Skift

Off-Beat European Countries Get Popular With American and Chinese Travelers
Daily Travel Startup Watch: Homelike, WunderWalk and More
Amtrak Reports Record Revenue Amid Fight for Federal Funding
From Campaigns to Content: The Evolution of Hotel Marketing