Throughout the week we post dozens of original stories, connecting the dots across the travel industry, and every weekend we sum it all up. This weekend roundup examines hospitality.

For all of our weekend roundups, go here.

Airbnb Gets New Power to Inform on Rivals When They Are Scofflaws: Is the Boston-Airbnb settlement, which calls for short-term regulatory platforms to comply with a city ordinance, a model for future agreements? Too soon to tell but what’s clear is that the alternative accommodations industry will one day transition from outliers to regulated entities.

Meeting Planners Weigh In on Trump’s Idea to Hold the G7 Summit at His Miami Resort: The property is definitely large enough, and is located near an international airport. On the other hand, there are major internet security concerns, and the hotel is a little impersonal. Plus, is the political fallout really worth it?

Trump Says His Resort Is Perfect for G7: Here’s What Event Planners Think: Meeting organizers are pretty mixed on whether or not the Doral is a good fit for the summit. But even the ones who are in full support of the venue say it’s impossible to take the politics out of it.

Hilton Doubles Down on Direct Booking Ad Strategy by Targeting Younger Travelers: Hilton’s new ad campaign rollout last year clearly opened the company’s eyes to reaching younger generations to build its leisure business.

Skift Global Forum Preview: Marriott’s Loyalty Program Key to Competing With Airbnb and All-Inclusive Players: Marriott believes it has a responsibility to make every type of lodging accommodation available to travelers. That, in a nutshell, explains the company’s activity — and challenge — so far in 2019.

Langham Lands a New Deal Located Within a UNESCO German Palace: With all the current troubles in Hong Kong, diversifying the business surely is a bigger priority. Langham has said it wants to expand big-time in Europe. It is re-entering the continent with style.

Hoteliers Take a Harder Look at How They Set Room Rates: Amateurs cut rates to fill hotel rooms. Pros take more sophisticated approaches, such as coordinating to stimulate demand from the most profitable customers.

Booking Holdings’ Push Into Homesharing Feels Like a Return to Its Roots: The hotel business was never an easy one for online travel companies. Far from it. But compared with the complexities of alternative accommodations, executives at Booking Holdings may come to regard the hotel business as a relative cakewalk.

The Savoy’s Carpenter Hammers Away to Make the Storied Hotel Instagrammable: As The Savoy’s in-house carpenter, a big part of Sam Beer’s job is to “make things that people want to take pictures of.” Turns out, that’s as fun for him as it is for the luxury hotel’s guests.

A New Wellness Hotel Gambles on Las Vegas: It’s difficult to say whether a wellness-themed hotel in Las Vegas can really take off. If the current state of the wellness industry is any indicator, the odds are (sort of) good.

Hotels Embrace Role as Curators of Niche Products: As brands struggle to break through with consumers, they need to consider introducing themselves within the environs of hotels. It’s a means to create a new relationship in a contextual way. And hospitality brands have a huge opportunity to introduce tastemakers to up-and-coming products.

High-End Hotels Lean Into Role as Curators of Niche Brands: At Skift New Luxury, we frequently write about cross-branding efforts between high-end brands. Hotels are especially well-positioned to provide a showcase for niche products and deepen the relationship with their guests in the process.

Photo Credit: An Airbnb listing in London. The homesharing platform has new settlements with Boston and Miami Beach. Airbnb