More and more business travelers are using Airbnb for their quick business trips, opting for a studio in the heart of downtown rather than a chain hotel next to the convention center. The bleisure trend is on the rise, and many travelers don’t want their work trips to feel so much like work.

This option is only viable for shorter stays, though. When employees are relocated, staying in a new city for a month or longer, their housing options get a lot narrower and a lot less interesting. Large corporate housing companies like Oakwood and National dominate the market, converting multi-unit buildings into generic apartments for business travelers.

Smaller companies have tried to change the status quo, but the sector is a tough one to break into. Startup Zeus Living entered the corporate housing space in 2015, providing travelers with individual homes in smaller neighborhoods around San Francisco, more along the lines of Airbnb. Since then, the company has spread to four cities total and continues to expand.

We talked to Zeus Living CEO Kulveer Taggar about how business travel is evolving and the challenges of entering the closed-off corporate housing market.

Check out this story, and many more, below.

If you have any feedback about the newsletter or news tips, feel free to reach out via email at ic@skift.com or tweet @ikcarey.

Isaac Carey, Travel Reporter

Featured Stories

Corporate Housing Is Getting (a Little) Less Boring: Startup Zeus Living is shaking things up, providing corporate travelers with a more Airbnb-like experience. Hopefully it catches on.

U.S. Airlines Prioritize Some Flights Over Others When Summer Storms Hit: Want to keep your summer storm delays to a minimum? Try to fly between the largest cities and book flights on the biggest aircraft. It’s not a foolproof plan, but it helps. Airlines prioritize certain flights, and it helps to know what they are.

United Airlines Removes Expiration Dates From Frequent Flyer Miles: United’s decision to remove the expiration date from MileagePlus accounts is a small gesture toward improving the lives of its loyalty program members — and could eventually be key to its growth.

Can Wellness Find Its Way Into the Cramped Confines of Economy Class? Thanks to the wellness movement, both airlines and airports are upping their healthy offerings, and not just for elite travelers. Whether or not the meditation apps and relaxation suites they’re increasingly offering is actually making a difference, though, is up for debate.

The Future Of Travel

AirAsia Chief Tony Fernandes Takes on Added Role as CEO of Airline’s Website: AirAsia’s head honcho can’t wait to transform the airline — he’s in the driver’s seat for AirAsia.com and pulling in the best of his troop on the journey. Second-quarter results, just out, show a rather promising platform.

Delta Pilots Upset That Primo Routes to Europe Are Going to Foreign Partners: At your typical U.S. airline, a minor dispute between a labor union and management is not unusual. But Delta has a lot fewer of these skirmishes than its competitors.

How Australia’s Webjet Is Building a Global Business by Going Wholesale: Webjet has really transformed its business over the past few years through a couple of sizable acquisitions. The Australian consumer market is proving pretty tough, so pursuing a strategy of global expansion in the wholesale arena makes sense.

Travel Reporter Isaac Carey [ic@skift.com] curates the Skift Corporate Travel Innovation Report. Skift emails the newsletter every Thursday.

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Photo Credit: An apartment offered by Zeus Living in Oakland, California. The startup is giving business travelers more choice when it comes to long-term rentals. Zeus Living