Throughout the week we post dozens of original stories, connecting the dots across the travel industry, and every weekend we sum it all up. This weekend roundup examines aviation.

For all of our weekend roundups, go here.

>>So much can happen between now and 2021. David Neeleman’s new airline may never get off the ground. But let’s hope for the best. The U.S. airline industry could use its first new entrant since 2007 to stir up competition: JetBlue’s Founder Confirms He’ll Start a U.S. Airline With New Airbus Jets

>>How fickle is Wall Street? Less than a year ago, investors weren’t keen on United’s stock. But a couple of quarters later, they’re jumping back on the bandwagon. But not all that much has changed: United Airlines Is Winning Over Some of the Doubters

>>We’re not sure Europe needs another airline with global ambitions. But more capacity almost always means cheaper fares, so passengers should enjoy watching these competitive dynamics play out. Perhaps Air Italy will become Italy’s national carrier if Alitalia stops flying. Or maybe they’ll both go bust: Newly Named Air Italy Is Ready to Take On Troubled Alitalia

>>U.S. bankruptcy law is funny, right? Less than a decade ago, Mesa Air Group filed for bankruptcy and investors lost out. But now the airline, with the same CEO, wants investors to give it another chance. Will they bite? Or do they have long memories? Mesa Air Wants to Try Again for an IPO 8 Years After Bankruptcy

>>Europe has seen significant tourism growth recently, but there is still more the destination can do to encourage visitors to come from afar: Why Europe Needs to Make Long-Haul Travel Easier

>>Ryanair’s CMO believes airline apps can be a big help to travelers as they’re preparing to get on a plane. And if those apps can also generate more revenue for carriers, all the better: Ryanair Believes Airline Apps Are Perfect for Last-Minute Upselling

>>Flight attendants on United will have both a stricter mandate and a stronger incentive to pitch the airline’s new co-branded credit card: Flyers Brace for More Credit Card Pitches, This Time on United Flights

>>Norwegian Air CEO Bjorn Kjos doesn’t care that some in Barcelona would prefer that the tourists stop coming. He can fill Boeing 787s at decent fares with Americans and Europeans who want to visit Spain. He has a business to run. Can we blame him for trying to maximize profits? Why Norwegian Air Doesn’t Worry About Overtourism When It Chooses New Routes

Photo Credit: Launch of JetBlue FlyFi on Dec. 11, 2013. JetBlue founder David Neeleman is starting a new U.S. airline. Anthony Quintano / Flickr