Throughout the week we post dozens of original stories, connecting the dots across the travel industry, and every weekend we sum it all up. This weekend roundup examines hospitality.

For all of our weekend roundups, go here.

>>AccorHotels, Airbnb, and everyone else in travel are clearly thinking about what it’ll take to be the “superbrand of travel” before other megabrands like Amazon and Google deepen their own investments in the travel space: What Accor’s Interest in Air France-KLM Means for the Travel Industry

>>If AccorHotels actually does invest in Air France-KLM that certainly would bring the company that much closer to being the full-service travel services company/brand that its CEO Sebastien Bazin has said he wants it to become: AccorHotels Considers Buying Stake in Air France-KLM

>>Marriott CEO Arne Sorenson, along with his fellow hotel CEOs are right: It’s not the “disruptors” like Airbnb that are the biggest threat, but the already established tech giants like Amazon, Google, Facebook, Tencent, Alibaba, and others that are the real competition for the hotel industry: Marriott CEO on Tech Giants: ‘We Are in an Absolute War for Who Owns the Customer’

>>Hyatt doesn’t want its Hyatt Place hotel brand to become the next Sheraton: Hyatt Place Launches New Features Catering to Business Travelers

>>While Airbnb has been brashly adding independent hotels, HomeAway has been quietly doing the same — although it has been using an entirely different business model given its ties to parent Expedia. Curation may have its place, but all of these companies realize that the more inventory and choice they give consumers, the more likely they are to spend on a stay: It’s Not Just Airbnb — HomeAway Starts Adding Hotels Too

>>In the hospitality business, the big are getting bigger — and, we hope, getting smarter about how they communicate that to consumers, and how they keep their hotel owners and franchisees happy. This points transfer and status match between Wyndham and La Quinta is a good start: Wyndham Hotels CEO on Life After Company Split: ‘La Quinta Will Be Transformational’

>>The general manager of Le Royal Monceau, Raffles Paris once told us that “the bathroom says everything about a hotel.” We agree. Focusing on the bathroom amenities — the soaps, lotions, and potions — provides a valuable insight into the brand story: Why Luxury Hotels Spend So Much Time Choosing Bathroom Amenities

>>AccorHotels and the rest of the hotel industry have some competition in their respective quests to get bigger: Thailand-Based Hotel and Restaurant Giant Minor to Take Over NH Hotels

>>Hotels can spend a surprising amount of time on bathroom amenities. Why? Because guests — especially big-spending ones — actually pay attention to what they put on their hair and body when they take a shower: What Bathroom Amenities Can Tell Us About Luxury Hotels

>>Catering is a key growth area for AccorHotels and this deal complements a number of others it has done in the sector: AccorHotels Buys Catering Tech Company Adoria

>>We’re putting our money on the Cromwell and LINQ brands to do well with the hotel owner/developer set, which is increasingly looking for upscale lifestyle and select-service brands. As for the Caesars Palace and Flamingo brands — they’re so inextricably tied to Vegas and to gaming, it’ll be hard to convince guests otherwise: Caesars Bets on Growing Its Business With Non-Gaming Hotels

>>One of the big questions when Marriott bought Starwood was which brands would survive. Executives at the company had the same question, and global brand officer Tina Edmundson explains what went into the decision to keep all 30: Skift Podcast: Why Marriott Is So Attached to Its 30 Brands

Photo Credit: Interior of a Novotel on March 31, 2018. Parent company AccorHotels is considering a stake in Air France-KLM. Abhinaba Basu / Flickr