Throughout the week we post dozens of original stories, connecting the dots across the travel industry, and every weekend we sum it all up. This weekend roundup examines aviation.

For all of our weekend roundups, go here.

Throughout the week we post dozens of original stories, connecting the dots across the travel industry, and every weekend we sum it all up. This weekend roundup examines aviation.

For all of our weekend roundups, go here.

>>Great Lakes Airlines is essentially going out of business. The Regional Airline Association is using this as a chance to lobby politicians to relax requirements on pilot training. But that’s probably not necessary. There’s reason to believe the Great Lakes situation was unique: U.S. Pilot Shortage Claims a Casualty: Will More Airlines Shut Down?

>>Oscar Munoz has once more adopted the role of chief apology officer as loyal passengers raise questions about how the airline treats animals. It’s a role that he’s used to at this point: Besieged United CEO Looks to Move Beyond Apologies, Crises

>>We’d love to see an airline rethink the business class experience. Perhaps one might retire all the fluff, like the multi-course attempts at fine dining, served on tablecloths. But people apparently like the business class pageantry, so it sticks around, even on new entrants, like Hong Kong Airlines: Longer Flights Have Hong Kong Airlines Rethinking Customer Experience

>>Could airlines stop with the 4 p.m. breakfasts? Savvy travelers want to get acclimated to their new time zone as fast as possible, and a later afternoon meal of sausage and eggs doesn’t help. But keep the coffee. It’s vital: Why Airlines Almost Always Serve Breakfast on Long-Haul Overnight Flights

>>Earlier Boeing 787 Dreamliners revolutionized aviation, allowing airlines to open sexy new long-haul routes. The 787-10 probably won’t do that, but it’s still an impressive aircraft: Boeing’s Newest Dreamliner Is More of a Regional Aircraft Than Its Predecessors

>>The fine here is miniscule. But the issues are interesting. Qantas has the right to fly between New York and Los Angeles, and it does so every day. But it can only carry a small subset of passengers: DOT Slaps Qantas for Violating Obscure U.S. Law

Photo Credit: American Airlines employee at Miami International Airport on Tuesday, August 29, 2017. The U.S. is experiencing a pilot shortage. Brandon Wade