Throughout the week we post dozens of original stories, connecting the dots across the travel industry, and every weekend we sum it all up. This weekend roundup examines aviation.

For all of our weekend roundups, go here.

>>Will blockchain’s impact be like the internet’s influence on travel? JetBlue Technology Ventures President Bonny Simi thinks so: JetBlue’s Venture Arm Expects Blockchain to Be a Major Disruptor

>>Something seems off about this. Yes, Gogo CEO Michael Small probably had to go. But shouldn’t the company have chosen a new CEO with a background in telecommunications? Gogo Replaces CEO With Its Largest Shareholder

>>American’s bare-bones basic economy fares are about to start appearing on long-haul routes: American Airlines Takes Basic Economy International

>>Casual travelers often think airlines in the same alliance love to cooperate with each other. That’s not always true. They’re often fierce competitors. At least SkyTeam has developed new technology that is designed to make it easier for airlines to rebook customers during irregular operations: SkyTeam Eases the Hassle of Getting Rebooked When Flights Get Disrupted

>>If you’re a high-value American Airlines customer, the carrier knows a lot about you. Now it wants to leverage that data in a more sophisticated way: American Airlines Knows if You’ve Been Cheating on It With a Competitor

>>American Airlines knows a lot about its frequent flyers. Now it wants to use that data to improve revenue. That’s sound strategy: American Airlines Knows Plenty About Its Most Loyal Customers

>>Qantas’ new pilot academy may address the airline’s needs, but won’t solve an imbalance which has already seen regional Australian airlines cancel and reschedule services. Meanwhile, the government has bowed to pressure and will again grant temporary visas to pilots after scrapping them last year: Qantas Takes Steps to Overcome Pilot Shortage

Photo Credit: American Airlines is concentrating on using its data to track customer loyalty. Miami International Airport