Throughout the week we post dozens of original stories, connecting the dots across the travel industry, and every weekend we sum it all up. This weekend roundup examines aviation.

For all of our weekend roundups, go here.

>>Most airlines are not advanced with their e-commerce strategies. Many have done OK without refining how they sell their products. But if they want to succeed in the long term, they probably must become more sophisticated in how they reach customers: Travel Megatrends 2018: Airlines Try to Become Storefronts Beyond the Seat

>>Upgrades to American’s domestic premium economy (Main Cabin Extra) foreshadow a better experience for elite travelers — but also the potential beginnings of an entirely new class of service: American Improves Its Domestic Premium Economy

>>Behind the usual Ryanair bluster there usually lurks a sensible business idea. If the airline offers a better accommodation product to customers, then that should persuade some to stay away from Booking.com: Ryanair Signals Its Hotel Ambitions With New TV Ad Campaign

>>Like most airlines, Air Canada knows a lot about its customers. But in 2020, once it launches a new loyalty program, it will have more flexibility to slice and dice data to deliver personal offers to passengers. Let’s hope customers don’t find it creepy: Why Air Canada Is Starting From Scratch With Its Loyalty Program

>>Sometimes you’ll buy a plane ticket and the airline might try to sell you a rental car. Other times, the airline will skip the car but ask if you want premium economy. Why? Carriers are using data to guess what extras you might buy: Carriers Want to Get More Personal

>>From what we’ve seen so far, travel brands with Super Bowl teasers are staying away from the culture wars and focusing on sending neutral messages with universal appeal. And while it’s important to draw attention to certain issues, it’s refreshing to watch light-hearted advertisements, too: Universal and Turkish Airlines Are Betting Big on Super Bowl Ads

Photo Credit: Passengers disembark a Ryanair plane May 13, 2015, at the Marseille Provence airport in southern France. Ryanair has ambitions in several areas outside aviation. Claude Paris / Associated Press