Throughout the week we post dozens of original stories, connecting the dots across the travel industry, and every weekend we sum it all up. This weekend roundup examines tourism.

For all of our weekend roundups, go here.

>>Travel leaders are at least starting to admit there might be a problem with unmanaged mass tourism, but many are still in denial about the real reasons it has become such a big issue: Overtourism Discussion Elicits Denials, Spin and Occasionally an Insightful Idea

>>U.S. tour operators and travel agents are betting that it will be business as usual, or perhaps even better, as the new Cuba restrictions take effect and individual people-to-people visas get sidelined. But many also find it ironic that the White House announced these changes while Trump was courting leaders of Asian countries that have poor human rights records: U.S. Tour Operators Optimistic About Cuba Travel Because They’re Even More Essential

>>As travelers crave more meaningful experiences during their vacations, where does that leave cruise ship shopping? Cruise operators are trying to figure that out and deliver the kind of retail that passengers will respond to: Cruise Lines Rethink Retail Shopping for Age of Experiences

>>Although the auto industry sits adjacent to travel with its own tricks and trials, executives in both camps are looking to respond to luxury consumers’ shifting priorities with the right balance of brands and packaging. Avenir is a good example of a team that’s doing it right: Buick Bets on Attainable Luxury With Latest Sub-Brand

>>Even an established tourism city like Washington, D.C. needs new destinations. While the capital city’s newest attraction has nothing to do with politics (thank goodness), it has everything to do with breaking down the walls between tourists and locals: The Wharf Turns Washington Into a Waterfront City

>>Today we’re prepping for Thanksgiving by showing our appreciation for our Skift fans by treating you all to a surprise — We’re announcing the dates for our 2018 Forums! Announcing All 2018 Skift Forum Dates

>>Thomas Cook indicated that the problems in the UK were specific to this summer and that overall the business is in good shape. That might be the case but if the UK economy is hit by any Brexit-related issues in 2018 it could be a similar story – or worse – next year: Thomas Cook Sees Profit Slump in UK Division

Photo Credit: A tourist bus in Havana, Cuba. U.S. tour operators are optimistic about gaining an advantage because of the particulars of the new Cuba travel restrictions. Skift