The U.S. Supreme Court announced on Monday morning that elements of the travel ban implemented by President Donald J. Trump will now be enforced until the court hears the case this October during its next term.

The ban will now apply to those with no connection to people or entities in the U.S. Potential travelers with “bona fide” connections in the U.S. will not be blocked from receiving a visa.

Basically, potential travelers from the targeted countries with relatives or employers in the U.S. will be allowed to receive a visa, as will students. They will need to provide documented proof of these relationships to be considered for a visa.

The onus now falls on U.S. Customs and Border Protection to implement the parts of the travel ban that are effective.

Both the first and second versions of the executive order had received judicial blocks in lower courts across the country.

A majority of U.S. citizens are opposed to the ban, according to an Associated Press survey.

U.S. Court of Appeals’ Ninth Circuit in San Francisco recently ruled that the majority of the travel ban would remain blocked, while the government would be able to review its internal immigration procedures per the second executive order.

“The injunctions remain in place only with respect to parties similarly situated to Doe, Dr. Elshikh, and Hawaii,” reads the ruling. “In practical terms, this means that [the travel ban] may not be enforced against foreign nationals who have a credible claim of a bona fide relationship with a person or entity in the United States. All other foreign nationals are subject to the provisions of [the second executive order].”

Refugees will also be subject to a similar ban; they must have a connection to people in the U.S. in order to travel to the country.

The full ruling is below:

Download (PDF, 105KB)

Photo Credit: President Donald J. Trump, center, flanked by Vice President Mike Pence, right, and Speaker of the House Paul Ryan. The White House / Flickr