weekly_trend_roundup.jpgEvery week we post hundreds of stories across various sectors in travel, connecting the dots across various global trends, and in these weekend posts we highlight the stories that tackle these trends. This one looks at top aviation trends.

For all of our trends roundups, go here.

>>American has gone more high-end with its new advertising campaign: American Airlines’ New Ad Campaign Wants to Humanize the Airline

>>Although you may be stuck in the middle seat — hey, look — there’s free in-flight entertainment: Upgrades Disappear as Airlines Make Smaller Improvements — Skift Business Traveler

>>Delta is once more doubling down in its campaign to woo Seattle customers: In the Battle for Seattle Flyers, Delta Is Practically Giving Away Elite Status

>>Scott Kirby, known for his strong financial acumen, could be the savior United’s investors have been seeking: United Poaches American Airlines President Scott Kirby

>>The U.S. government has had nearly 15 years to figure out how to fund and staff the TSA. It’s still failing: New York and Los Angeles Airport Scares Highlight TSA’s Failures

>>Munoz still has the goodwill of industry observers, but he’s going to need to make an impact on consumer-friendly metrics like on-time arrivals as well as market-friendly ones like earnings: United CEO on First Year in Charge: ‘We Need to Treat People Better’

>>Allegiant Air knows less about its most loyal customers than it would like. Its new co-branded credit card could help change that. But will anyone apply for it? Allegiant Air Banking on New Credit Card Deal to Reveal More About Its Flyers

>>We’ve entered a new phase of airline leadership this year with new CEOs at Delta and United and American’s upstart Doug Parker in the senior role: American Air’s Former President Has Excellent Timing — Skift Business Traveler

>>How the UK extricates itself from this will be just one area to keep an eye on in the coming negotiations: Ryanair Boss Explains Just Why Brexit Will Be So Difficult

>>Airlines prefer not to take risks with most of their senior hires, which makes sense, because the industry is more complicated than most: United’s New President Shows Why Airlines Hire Insiders as Senior Executives