Throughout the week we post dozens of original stories, connecting the dots across the travel industry, and every weekend we sum it all up. This weekend roundup examines tourism trends.

For all of our weekend roundups, go here.

Cruise Insiders (and Outsiders) Highlight Challenges the Industry Must Address: It was refreshing to hear some honest talk about parts of the cruise industry where there is room for improvement. More, please.

Travel and Tourism’s Good, Bad and Ugly Sides: Yes, travel and tourism is a wealth and job creator, but the industry needs to recognize how it plays a central role in some of the world’s biggest problems.

The Overtourism Factor: Gauging Residents’ Sentiments Through Local Media: Skift Research. Overtourism is one of the biggest challenges faced by the travel industry. Quantifying it helps diagnose and fight the issue. Our new method of measuring local sentiment toward tourists can build upon and complement existing overtourism metrics.

Travel Advisors Boost Political Contributions in These Highly Partisan Times: Supporting advocacy efforts on the state and federal levels for the rights of travel advisors is gaining momentum. Among indicators are growing contributions to ASTA’s political action committee.

How One Canadian Province Uses Icebergs to Attract Visitors: The best advice for destinations large and small as they embark upon marketing campaigns is keep it real. The efforts of isolated, iceberg-laden Newfoundland and Labrador is proof that going with the authenticity “floe” can melt the hearts of potential visitors.

Rise of Voluntourism Presents New Challenges for Advisors: Who would have thought that people would pay to do back-breaking work and enjoy the experience? Voluntourism is gaining momentum and putting pressure on advisors to match traveler skills and expectations with community and conservation needs.

Visit Florida’s Future Is Up in the Air (Again): Destination marketing money is again a political football in Florida, a state that 126 million people visited last year. As governments around the country examine their stance on publicly funded self-promotion, will the Sunshine State stay the course?

The Super Rich Are Creating New Opportunities for Travel Advisors: Ultra-wealthy travelers are growing in number, and many are willing to pay for expertise in fulfilling their champagne wishes and caviar dreams. However, serving these clients, especially the newly rich, can put advisors to the test.

Photo Credit: Silversea Cruises’ Silver Explorer in Greenland Silversea Cruises