Skift Travel News Blog

Short stories and posts about the daily news happenings around the travel industry.

Tourism

Morocco Expected to Set Tourism Record Despite Headwinds

2 months ago

Morocco is on path to set a record for tourist arrivals this year in spite of challenges such as disruptions from September’s massive earthquake and the aftermath of Hamas’ attacks in Gaza.

The country’s tourism ministry anticipates hitting 14 tourist arrivals by the end of the year, eclipsing the record of 13 million set in 2019. Roughly 13.2 million international travelers visited the North African nation during the first eleven months of 2023.

Morocco welcomed 11 million tourists last year.

Tourism Minister Fatim-Zahra Ammor said Morocco is looking to hit 17.5 million visitors by 2026 with the help of new airline routes. Ryanair announced recently it would launch 24 international routes to Morocco from eight European countries.

Morocco has continued to experience tourism success this fall despite being hit by a 6.8 magnitude earthquake in September that resulted in at least 2,900 deaths. The country welcomed 960,000 international travelers that month, a 8.5% jump from September 2019. Skift reported in October that several historical sites in Marrakech — near the epicenter of the earthquake — had reopened to visitors.

Hassan II Mosque
Morocco’s attractions – like the Hassan II Mosque in Casablanca – are set for record tour numbers this year (Source: YoTuT/Flickr).

Tourism

Morocco’s Tourism Surged in September Despite Earthquake

4 months ago

The September 8 earthquake did not halt Morocco’s post-pandemic tourism boom. The country welcomed 960,000 international travelers in September, up 8.5% from the same month in 2019, according to the the Morocco Tourism Office’s latest data. Between January and September, international travel to Morocco rose 44% compared to the same period in 2019.

On September 8, a devastating 6.8 magnitude earthquake struck the Atlas Mountains. Multiple tour operators temporarily canceled or suspended operations in the immediate aftermath.