Throughout the week we post dozens of original stories, connecting the dots across the travel industry, and every weekend we sum it all up. This weekend roundup examines aviation.

For all of our weekend roundups, go here.

>>Frequent flyers on Virgin America and Alaska now have some insight into how their loyalty programs will coexist in early 2017. But there’s much more to learn about how the joint operation will soon look: Alaska and Virgin America Become One — Skift Business Traveler

>>Delta and Alaska haven’t been cozy for years, but many customers still have enjoyed the reciprocal frequent flyer benefits. Now that’s about to end, and the airlines will be true competitors: Frenemies No More, Delta and Alaska Will End Partnership

>>$5.1 million is not a lot of money for a giant global airline, but for US Airways — and later American — this was always about more than money. The airlines argue that firms like Sabre have long held too much power: American Air Wins Its Five-Year-Old Anti-Trust Lawsuit Against Sabre

>>A prudent strategy for Airbnb might be to initially partner with an online travel agency in an affiliate relationship so it can access flights for its customers. In that way, Airbnb could test whether its users want to book flights on the site without taking the big risks involved in making a large acquisition: Airbnb Flights: Should It Build, Buy or Borrow an Airline Booking Service?

>>The terms aren’t as generous as Delta wanted, but the carrier still should be able to get plenty out of its partnership with Mexico’s only full-service airline: Delta and Aeromexico will Pay High Price for Antitrust Immunity

Photo Credit: Does Airbnb, which is scaling its short-term rental business, want to start dealing with the complex business of flight bookings? Pictured, travelers talk on their cell phones as they stand in line at the Delta ticketing counter at Washington National Airport this summer. Carolyn Kaster / Associated Press