What to Know Now

German carrier Air Berlin has been trying to find its way for over eight years, hemorrhaging cash and piling up losses along most of the way. With the situation starting to get urgent, part of its latest strategy is to start serving business class customers on short-haul European flights through a new dedicated cabin — a contrast from the airline’s single-cabin approach thus far.

In addition to new cabins, the carrier is also continuing to expand into the U.S. with new routes from Berlin to Los Angeles, Orlando and San Francisco. Many of the current routes to the U.S. will also be operated with a greater frequency, expanding capacity by up to 50%.

Together, these efforts should expose Air Berlin to passengers in both new demographics and geographies. Enough new passengers to keep the ship from sinking? Ask again next year.

Social Quote of the Day

Going far far FAR west today… About as close as you can get to Russia on a commercial flight from ANC.

@ZachHonig | Zach Honig Editor-in-Chief of The Points Guy and traveler to the far reaches of Alaska

airberlin Herzen. Berlin, den 16.03.2015


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Your Turn

We knew it wouldn’t be long after David Farley moved to Berlin before started filing for The New York Times. His first piece touching on dinner parties and the local immigrant culture ran last week.

Tips and Comments

Can be sent to gm[at]skift[dot]com or to @grantkmartin

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Photo Credit: A woman stands behind the exhibition stand of Air Berlin at the ITB tourism fair in Berlin. The low-cost carrier is adding a business class in an attempt to slow losses. Tobias Schwarz / Reuters