weekly_trend_roundup.jpgEvery week we post hundreds of stories across various sectors in travel, connecting the dots across various global trends, and in these weekend posts we highlight the stories that tackle these trends. This one looks at top aviation trends.

For all of our trends roundups, go here.

>>For a while, their best passengers will be able to try it out for free: American’s New International Premium Economy Will Begin as a Free Upgrade for Elites

>>Now, the airline and its customers need to figure out how booking and upgrades are going to work: American Announces Schedule for International Premium Economy — Skift Business Traveler

>>Hawaiian Airlines and JetBlue Airlines are once again ganging up on Delta. But this time it’s about Mexico, not the Middle East: The Big Reason Hawaiian and JetBlue Oppose Delta’s Aeromexico Joint Venture

>>The branded credit card remains one of the industry’s most profitable and productive marketing programs: American Air Has Two New Very Profitable Credit Card Loyalty Deals

>>Thanks to one FAA decision, more than $400 million in assets simply disappeared from United’s books: United Airlines Takes a $400 Million Hit After FAA Lifts Newark Limits

>>Reform itself is probably impossible given its current bureaucratic structure, which doesn’t punish employees strongly enough for misbehavior and insulates the TSA’s leadership: Nearly Half of TSA Employees Have Been Cited for Misconduct

>>Expect more airlines to consider seat auctions or other ways to monetize items they used to give away to loyal flyers: Airlines Are Auctioning Seats Rather Than Upgrading Loyal Passengers

>>Airlines remain highly profitable, but there are signs U.S. carriers may be expanding too much: Delta Air Lines Will Slow Growth to Ensure Business Travelers Pay Higher Fares

>>For United, this went about as well as the airline could have hoped: United Is Fined $2.25 Million Over ‘Chairman’s Flight’ for Political Operative

Photo Credit: A TSA officer, left, checks a passenger's ticket, boarding pass and passport at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York. A new report cites an alarming rate of complaints against agents. Mark Lennihan / AP Photo