U.S. aviation regulators’ attempts to streamline flight routes into major airports have been plagued by delays and airlines’ low usage of the new procedures, according to a government report.

The Federal Aviation Administration lacks standard training for pilot and air-traffic controllers on how to utilize the new routes, the Transportation Department’s Inspector General said today.

As a result, flight paths into 14 major airports designed to improve efficiency have been used by only 2 percent of eligible airline flights, the report said. Introducing more precise flight tracks is a cornerstone of the FAA’s NextGen program to modernize the air-traffic system.

The report comes a day after the FAA touted the introduction of new routes into and out of the Houston area. The FAA said the more-efficient routings would save airlines 3 million gallons of fuel each year.

To contact the reporter on this story: Alan Levin in Washington at [email protected] To contact the editors responsible for this story: Romaine Bostick at [email protected]; Bernard Kohn at [email protected]

Tags: faa
Photo Credit: An American Eagle flight waits for release from the air traffic control tower at Central Illinois Regional Airport in Bloomington, Ill. The Pantagraph, Steve Smedley / Associated Press