Wi-Fi in the sky is a rare bright spot in an industry that engenders ever lower customer expectations. Five years after Gogo launched its in-flight Wi-Fi service, most passengers still don’t pay for Internet in the sky, but there’s every reason to believe they’re beginning to see the value of staying connected en route. As Gogo disclosed in an updated IPO filing last week, its sales and installations have been growing, and it is inching toward profitability.

Gogo’s in-flight Wi-Fi service was installed on 1,565 planes at the end of June and available to about 65.5 million passengers in the June quarter. Both of those stats have grown around one-third in the past year.