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Best Travel Ads This Week: Elements of an Experience

@SamShankman

Aug 15, 2014 7:00 am

Skift Take

An ad’s sole purpose can be showcasing a part of a destination or experience that most customers don’t know about, but it must connect that element back to the whole in order to drive bookings.

— Samantha Shankman

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Alaska Airlines  / YouTube

Seattle Seahawks quarterback Russell Wilson stars in Alaska Airlines' latest ad. Alaska Airlines / YouTube


This week’s travel ads tackle one element of the promoted experience or destination in order to attract a specific set of travelers while piquing the interest of others.

FOR ALL OF OUR SKIFTADS OF THE WEEK COLLECTION, CHECK OUT OUR ARCHIVES HERE.

Alaska Airlines‘ “Chief Football Officer” Russell Wilson takes employees through a one of a kind training camp in the airline’s latest ad spot. Wilson leads employees through a comical high-stepping obstacle course, a lost teddy bear running drill, and snack delivery accuracy training.

Destination DC attempts to show a different side of the capital city by highlighting different neighborhoods, parks and shops throughout the city. The ad, though overproduced, takes an untraditional stab at showcasing the capital; however, its attempt to make the city seem popular with a new tourist arriving as the other leaves fall short of significance.

Air New Zealand is in the midst of a campaign that highlights comical, but attractive, mountain scenes in an attempt to woo viewers into considering a trip. As the flag carrier for the country, Air New Zealand is able to promote the destination as much as the air service itself.

Lufthansa Airlines‘ latest ad targets Indian travelers with a cute tale about a grandfather and his grandson taking a trip. The man describes Germans as serious people with poor taste in movies and film so the child is surprised to find Bollywood movies and Indian meals available on the flight.

The ad is a clever way to show, rather than tell, viewers that adapts the in-flight experience to certain markets’ expectations. The ad ends with the line, “More Indian than you think.”

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