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Star Alliance Launches New Round-the-World Fare Product

May 15, 2014 7:30 am

Skift Take

Round-the-world tickets aren’t a frequent purchase, but they’re an excellent way to market an alliance’s size, network, and amenities.

— Jason Clampet

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Star Alliance

Staff from Star Alliance airlines welcome EVA Air to the Star Alliance family. The staff representatives pose on a stage specially created for the EVA Air joining ceremony, with an EVA Star Alliance branded aircraft as part of the backdrop. Star Alliance


Star Alliance has announced the launch of new Round-the-World (RTW) Fare Levels, which will offer lower fares to passengers throughout all three classes of service.

They have also announced the launch of a multi-channel media campaign to promote this program, with will be run on their alliance website and member airline websites as well as sites such as TripAdvisor, LinkedIn, Expedia, CNN.com, and SeatGuru in select markets.

The alliance announced that they offer the best fare for this adventure to passengers traveling a maximum of 26,000 miles in Economy Class with a minimum of three and a maximum of five stops. Higher fare Economy packages of 29,000, 34,000, or 39,000 miles offer 15 stops; but now passengers can reduce the stops by more than half to a maximum 7 stops for a discount of 10%. This could be marketed as their “Less World More Sky Program,” but it probably won’t be.

A Business Class program allows passengers to fly at a lower fare for up to 26,000 miles coverage, if they wish to, or select from the established 29,000, 34,000 or 39,000 miles at the standard fare. There are no changes to the stops for Business Class passengers. The minimum remains at three and the maximum at 15.

The program remains unchanged for First Class tickets, maintaining the same 29,000, 34,4000 and 39,000 fare levels.

Conditions apply, and passengers would be wise to read the further details on their website, the FAQs and fine print before booking.

Parents traveling with children will pay 75% of the fare for children between the age of two and eleven, and infants under two pay 10% for the privilege of sitting on your lap. It’s not in the fine print, but that airlines take no responsibility for turbulence is a given.

Marisa Garcia has worked in aviation since 1994, spending 16 years on the design and manufacturing of cabin interiors and cabin safety equipment. She shares insights gained from this experience on Flight Chic and Tweets as @designerjet.

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