Transport Airlines

5 Aviation Trends We’re Tracking at Skift This Week

Mar 01, 2014 7:00 am

Daniel Munoz  / Reuters

A Qantas Boeing 747 prepares to land at Kingsford Smith international aiport in Sydney August 20, 2013. Daniel Munoz Daniel Munoz / Reuters


Every week we post hundreds of stories across various sectors in travel, connecting the dots across various global trends, and in these weekend posts we highlight the stories that tackle these trends. This one looks at top aviation trends. For all of our trends roundups, go here.

>> TSA continues to build layer on top of layer in its complicated security infrastructure: TSA Continues PreCheck Registration Rollout In Savannah, GA

The TSA’s ambitious rollout plan is one of the few things it has done in its 13-year history that’s been roundly praised by the general public.

>> There’s a very logical reason behind commercial airlines’ pilot shortage: Airlines’ Pilot Shortage Is Due to Too Low Salaries, Suggests GAO Report

There are more than enough trained pilots to fill all open commercials jobs, but they’re choosing careers that offer fair pay and a place to sleep. Commercial carriers will need to improve labor conditions to attract the workers they want.

>> Loyalty programs reorganize in favor of high spenders: The Reinvention of Loyalty Programs Will Force Travelers to Be More Serious About Being Loyal

We don’t like to say ‘we told you so,’ but on Tuesday we told you that loyalty was changing in our bi-monthly trends report.

>> Airports introduce retail that reflects the local culture: Heathrow Targets High-Spending Flyers with Terminal 2 Retail Selection

Airports continue to evolve into mini representations of the cities they serve and Heathrow is doing this with a focus on future revenues. In its ambition to become a luxury hub, it must also remember to provides spaces and services for average and budget flyers.

>> Airlines fight for the best in-flight safety videos: The New Virgin Atlantic Safety Video: A Nod To Classic Movie Culture

At what point does the point of these safety videos fade into obscurity as everyone searches for a viral hit? At what point does stretching the boundaries for a creative hit mean these videos become parody of themselves? Next up: some airline should do a parody safety video around new genre of safety videos.

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