Digital

Conde Nast Traveller Wants to Teach Travel Journalism

@jasonclampet

Dec 03, 2013 12:40 pm

Skift Take

There are a dwindling number of print outlets like CNT where a travel writer can place a story. The better bet for aspiring authors would be to take a course on building up their own independent online and social media presence.

— Jason Clampet

Get the Latest Intelligence on the Travel Industry

Secret to a writing gig at Conde Nast Traveller UK? Get a story angle that requires putting a skinny white girl in a bikini.


Conde Nast Traveller – the thinner UK one, not the truth taste in travel one — is hosting a two-day seminar aimed at selling its expertise to aspiring travel writers and photographers.

For a $900 admission fee, instructors from the magazine will share insight over the weekend of January 25 at Conde Nast’s Vogue House in London. Topics include charming editors, taking a good picture, social media outreach, and something called getting “on the digital ladder.”

The speaker line-up includes:

  • Nicholas Coleridge, President of Condé Nast International
  • Melinda Stevens, Editor of Condé Nast Traveller
  • Giles Foden, author of The Last King of Scotland
  • Martin Morrell, award-winning travel photographer
  • Tony Cross, Executive Editor of CNTraveller.com

Editor-in-Chief Stevens has one of the more entertaining editor’s letters you’ll find in a monthly magazine — combining loopy memories of childhood with total Ryanair-related meltdowns. Tip for attendees: You only get to write this way if you are an editor-in-chief.

This is the first time Conde has put on the travel course, but in 2012 the magazine brand dove into education in the UK, launching the Conde Nast College of Fashion and Design. One imagines it teaches, among other things, which Louis Vuitton-related stories you absolutely must commission when Louis Vuitton buys a full-page ad.

One participant will be selected to visit an English country house for a weekend and write about it for the magazine. It does not say whether the contributor will be paid in money or in attention.

Making back the $900 may be a challenge for most of the travel program’s participants. According to the National Union of Journalists, CN Traveller pays a little more than $250 for a 400-word story — and that’s pretty good pay for a travel writer.

Tags: , , ,

Follow @jasonclampet

Next Up

More on Skift

Sabre Stock Up 6.6% on Stock Market Debut
Skift Business Traveler: Marriott Named the Best Hotel Loyalty Program
Snackable Short-Form Videos Are Making a Mark in Travel Marketing
How Visual Social Media Marketing Engages Chinese Travelers

We're the Moneyball of the Travel Industry

We know what's coming next in travel. Subscribe to the newsletter and get all the goodness in your inbox daily.