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U.S. Proposal to Allow In-Flight Phone Calls Meets Immediate Resistance

Nov 21, 2013 8:34 pm

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Flyers, flight attendants, and anybody with a common sense knows this is a terrible. Even if it technically feasible, it should be socially unacceptable.

— Samantha Shankman

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Jason Reed  / Reuters

U.S. President Barack Obama (unseen) announces venture capitalist Tom Wheeler to head the Federal Communication Commission (FCC) at the State Dining Room of the White House in Washington, May 1, 2013. Jason Reed / Reuters


Rules against making cellphone calls during airline flights are “outdated,” and it’s time to change them, federal regulators said Thursday, drawing immediate howls of protest from flight attendants, airline officials and others.

Tom Wheeler, the new chairman of the Federal Communications Commission, said in a statement Thursday that the commission was proposing greater in-flight access to mobile broadband. The proposal will be considered at the commission’s Dec. 12 meeting.

“The time is right to review our outdated and restrictive rules,” Wheeler said, adding that modern technologies can deliver mobile services in the air safely and reliably.

Early reaction was skeptical. Flight attendants and others have worried that a plane full of chattering passengers could lead to arguments and undermine safety.

“Passengers overwhelmingly reject cellphone use in the aircraft cabin. The FCC should not proceed with this proposal,” the Association of Flight Attendants said in a statement in response to the FCC chairman’s comments.

“In far too many operational scenarios, passengers making phone calls could extend beyond a mere nuisance, creating negative effects on aviation safety and security that are great and far too risky,” the flight attendants group said.

American Airlines spokeswoman Andrea Huguely said the airline will wait to see what the FCC does. “However, our Wi-Fi at this time doesn’t allow voice calls.”

“Our customer feedback indicates people may not want that policy but of course tastes and desires change,” JetBlue spokesman Morgan Johnston said in an email. “We would prioritize making the cabin comfortable and welcoming for all — for those who want cell service and for those who like peace and quiet.”

Henry H. Harteveldt, a travel analyst with Hudson Crossing, said, “There are bad ideas, and then there’s this.”

“Unlike the ability to use their personal electronics and Wi-Fi from gate to gate, passengers don’t want this,” he added. “The constant chatter of passengers on their mobile phones has the potential to further increase tension among already stressed-out passengers. It will be a catalyst for increased cases of ‘air rage.'”

The Federal Aviation Administration recently lifted restrictions on the use of most personal electronic devices during takeoffs and landings, but not cellphone calls, which fall under the FCC.

Mayerowitz reported from New York. AP Airlines reporter David Koenig in Dallas contributed to this report.

Copyright (2013) Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

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