Transport Airports

New Tibet Airport Cuts Tourists’ Trips from Two Days to One Hour

Sep 16, 2013 11:45 am

Skift Take

China is quickly improving airport infrastructure to meet the needs of its growing traveler population. The rapid development is opening up new areas of the country to tourism, with positive and negative unintended consequences.

— Samantha Shankman

Win an All-Expenses Paid Trip to NYC to Tour the Future of Travel

China Daily   / Reuters

Local Tibetans wave hada, or traditional silk scarves, as they greet the first group of passengers who landed at Daocheng Yading Airport in Daocheng county of Garze Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture, Sichuan province September 16, 2013. China Daily / Reuters


China opened the world’s highest civilian airport on Monday, in a restive and remote Tibetan region of southwestern Sichuan province, which will cut journey times from the provincial capital from two days to a little more than one hour.

Daocheng airport in Garzi, a heavily ethnic Tibetan part of Sichuan, is 4,411 meters (14,472 feet) above sea level, and overtakes Qamdo airport in Tibet, which sits at 4,334 meters above sea level, for the title of world’s highest.

The official Xinhua news agency said flights would initially connect with Chengdu, the provincial capital, otherwise a two-day bus trip away. Flights to cities including Shanghai, Guangzhou and Chongqing will begin at a later date.

The 1.58 billion yuan ($258 million) airport, designed to handle 280,000 passengers a year, will help open up the nearby Yading Nature Reserve to tourism, Xinhua added, referring to an area renowned for its untouched natural beauty.

China has embarked upon a multi-billion-dollar program in recent years to revamp old airports and build new ones, especially in the remote west, as a way of boosting the economy.

Some of these airports have been located in Tibetan regions, whose population chafes at Chinese political control, and often have a dual military purpose so troops can be bought in quickly during periods of unrest.

Garzi has been the scene of numerous self-immolation protests against Chinese rule in the last three years or so and remains under tight security.

Reporting by Ben Blanchard. Editing by Ron Popeski.

Copyright (2013) Thomson Reuters. Click for restrictions

Tags: ,

Next Up

More on Skift

5 Tourism Trends We’re Tracking At Skift This Week
3 Digital Trends We’re Tracking At Skift This Week
Travel Startup Smart Host Aims to Bring Flexible Pricing to Vacation Rentals
Free WiFi Tops Business Travelers’ List of Hotel Must-Haves