Destinations

Segway operators need modicum of expertise to run tours rules D.C. judge

Mar 28, 2013 2:40 pm

Skift Take

The ruling is a comforting reminder that, at least in one city, tour operators must offer some substantial information alongside their goofy toys.

— Samantha Shankman

Free Report: The State of Student Travel

MobMob  / Flickr

Tourists take a Segway tour past the White House in Washington, D.C. MobMob / Flickr


The operators of a Washington Segway tour business have lost a lawsuit against the city over regulations that require tour guides to be knowledgeable about city history and architecture.

Bill Main and Tonia Edwards, who operate Segs in the City, sued in 2010. They said regulations that require guides like them to take a test and obtain a license violate their free speech rights. The city countered that its regulations don’t restrict what a tour guide can say on a tour.

On Thursday Judge Paul L. Friedman issued a one-page order granting the city’s request to dismiss the case. Friedman did not immediately issue an opinion explaining his reasoning.

Robert McNamara, a lawyer who represents Segs in the City, said he intends to appeal.

Copyright (2013) Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

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