Transport Airlines

A brief history of drunk pilots: It’s refreshingly briefer than you think

Excerpt from Bloomberg Businessweek

Jan 10, 2013 1:36 am

Skift Take

Inebriated pilots are few and far between and the lack of commercial airline fatalities due to a sloshed captain point once again to the safety of the skies.

— Jason Clampet

Sponsored by:

Report: Social Media Customer Service in the Travel Industry

Last Friday, 48 year-old American Eagle (AAMRQ) pilot Kolbjorn Jarle Kristiansen was forced from the cockpit after airline employees detected booze on him at Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport. Kristiansen subsequently failed a breathalyzer, was arrested, and currently awaits blood tests that will reveal how drunk he really was. He is suspended and faces an internal investigation that could cost him his job.

In the U.S., federal rules prohibit a pilot from operating an aircraft if he or she has a blood-alcohol content of .04 percent or higher—or within eight hours of having consumed an alcoholic beverage, the period known as “bottle to throttle.”

Read the Complete Story →

Tags: ,

Next Up

More on Skift

The Surprising Vacation Habits of Americans Abroad
The World’s 15 Largest Travel Companies of 2014
One Company’s Non-Traditional Path to Free In-Flight Wi-Fi
What Today’s Global Business Travelers Need In a Corporate Travel Program